Man discovers rock used as doorstop is meteorite worth $100K

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Man discovers rock used as doorstop is meteorite worth $100K

Geology faculty member Monica Sirbescu shared that an unidentified man from Grand Rapids, Michigan, approached her to check out his 22.5-pound meteorite.

"For 18 years, the answer has been categorically 'no, '" she said.

"I could tell right away that this was something special", she said.

Even though Dr. Sirbescu knew exactly what it was, it had to be sent to the Smithsonian Museum for verification, it wasn't until Thursday word came back it definitively is a meteorite, the 6th largest ever found in MI.

"It's the most valuable specimen I have ever held in my life, monetarily and scientifically", Sibescu added, noting that the meteorite is composed of of 88.5 percent iron and 11.5 percent nickel.

Central Michigan University is now holding the meteorite.

A Grand Rapids, Michigan, man, who wishes to remain anonymous, bought a farm in 1988. Most iron meteorites are generally comprised of anywhere between 90 and 95 percent iron, with the rest made up nickel, iridium, gallium and occasionally gold.

When the new owner moved after a few years, he took the mystery rock, which he has kept as a doorstop and a show-and-tell item for his kids in school. The farmer told Mazurek that he and his father watched the chunk of rock slam into their property one night and picked it up the next day, when it was still warm to the touch.

"A piece of the early solar system literally fell into our hands", Dr Sirbescu said in a video made by the university to promote its discovery.

The largest meteorite found on Earth was the Hoba in Namibia, weighing 66 tons.

The Smithsonian and a mineral museum in ME are considering buying the meteorite - now called "Edmore" - for display, according to CMU.

The 22lb (10kg) meteorite was the biggest the geologist had been asked to examine in her career.

There is a possibility that the analysis could reveal rare elements that could increase its value. This is apparently something that happens quite frequently to Sirbescu, who is part of the university's department of earth and atmospheric sciences.

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