Experts recommend vaccinations at onset of flu season

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Experts recommend vaccinations at onset of flu season

CDC estimates that flu vaccines prevent tens of thousands of hospitalizations each year and a CDC study in 2017 was the first of its kind to show flu vaccination reduced the risk of flu-associated death by half (51 percent) among children with underlying high-risk medical conditions and by almost two-thirds (65 percent) among healthy children.

Vaccination rates among children declined 1.1 percent during the flu season of 2017-18.

Pregnant women are more susceptible to life-threatening complications if they get the flu, a fact that makes the results of a new survey showing that only half of pregnant women get vaccinated so troubling.

People who get the flu are also at risk for a "post-flu illness" that can pose potentially serious health risks even after the primary infection is over, federal health authorities warned today at a news conference in Washington, DC, to promote flu vaccination. "So you should try and get your flu shot as early as possible because it will take those two weeks to begin protecting you".

It seems like as soon as fall gets here, we're already on the lookout for flu-like symptoms.

The makeup of the vaccine has been changed this year to try to better protect against expected strains.

Past year 180 children died.

Even if a vaccine is less effective, it's still enough to help protect you.

There are other preventative measures everyone should practice to prevent the flu and other illnesses.

Flu can lead to permanent disability in older people.

Health experts have updated this year's flu vaccine to protect against the viruses they believe will be circulating during flu season.

Opportunities for free flu vaccines are plentiful in Umatilla County after the flu killed an estimated 80,000 people in the United States a year ago. "It's their social responsibility to get vaccinated". According to Webb-Collins, this is particularly important when it comes to school children who may come in contact with classmates who are not vaccinated or are sick.

If you don't get vaccinated, you could be putting other people at risk, especially the elderly, children and those with weak immune systems.

There are a number of reasons why this last flu season was so bad.

Ask your doctor about getting a flu vaccine. And the CDC believes the number is thought to be underestimated, as not all flu-related deaths are reported. When tissues are not readily available, cough into a sleeve, not hands.

Five Minnesota children died from influenza or related complications last winter and more than 6400 people of all ages were hospitalized.

"Statistically speaking, (the vaccine) is very helpful to prevent the flu", Bejarano said.

Overall, the effectiveness of the seasonal flu vaccine for last season was estimated to be 40%.

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