U.S., Canadian trade negotiators set for second day of…

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U.S., Canadian trade negotiators set for second day of…

Canada's closed, $16 billion dairy market is among the last sticking points in talks between US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, which broke up on Friday without a deal.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the mechanism is crucial to a new NAFTA, but Mexico already has agreed to drop it.

Trudeau and his ministers will hold a caucus retreat in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, to plot their strategy.

U.S. President Donald Trump said at the White House that trade talks with Canada were going well and that Ottawa wants to make a deal.

"Our baseline is that Canada will join the U.S. -Mexico agreement, making concessions on dairy, but that it likely will have to make some concession on dispute resolution as well".

Freeland said both sides are "continuing to work very hard" in a recent press release, though she stresses that Canada will not sign a deal unless it is in the best interest of Canadians.

Wiens declined to say what action the organization would take if an updated NAFTA deal gave the US a greater chunk of the Canadian market, but did not rule out campaigning against ratification of the agreement, or the Liberal government.

Concerned hopefulness seems to be a good description for the many Canadians awaiting the outcome of negotiations to update trade arrangements among the United States, Canada and Mexico. Freeland said she would meet with Lighthizer when negotiators found issues that needed to be elevated to the ministerial level.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said he expected Canada to also scrap a two-year-old pricing agreement that has restricted U.S. exports of ultra-filtered milk used to make dairy products.

Daniel Ujczo, a US trade lawyer who has worked for both the Canadian and the USA governments, rejects the notion that Canada and the United States are at a stalemate.

His comments echoed Trump, who said on Tuesday that while Ottawa wants a deal, he could go either way, depending on what concessions will come from the talks.

"I think this is a complicated time for employees".

Craft, a fixture at the NAFTA talks last week, was in Gander, N.L., to commemorate the role that town played on the day 17 years ago when the United States shut down its airspace, forcing countless passenger airliners to find refuge wherever they could.

The uncertainty over the fate of NAFTA, in light of a tentative U.S. -Mexico trade deal, has not gone away even as trade experts note that members of Congress, concerned about the trade ties between the two countries, may help ensure that a final deal includes Canada. "That's not who we are", Craft said in prepared remarks. "We're just going to stay working constructively to get to that win, win, win that we know is there", he said in the interview.

Experts note that the desire to make a trade deal happen is influenced by upcoming political events, including the USA midterm elections in November, a transition of presidential power in Mexico in December and next year's Canadian election.

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