SpaceX successfully launches newest reusable rocket

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SpaceX successfully launches newest reusable rocket

The first-stage booster previously soared in May, the first time out the gate for this upgraded rocket.

It's also the first re-flight of the company's new, recyclable Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket, which had its first launch back in May. Just nine minutes later, the rocket's first stage made a successful landing on the "Of course I still love you' drone ship aba coast, according to CNBC".

For Telkom Indonesia, the launch restores the state-owned operator's fleet back to three satellites after one of its satellites exploded in orbit last August. The launch was used to deliver the Merah Putih satellite to a Geostationary Transfer Orbit.

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket lifts off at 1:18 a.m. EDT (0518 GMT) Tuesday with the Merah Putih communications satellite.

SpaceX used its newest style booster for the second time to put a communications satellite into orbit for Indonesia. This was SpaceX's 15th launch so far this year and its 60th of a Falcon 9 rocket.

"We are going to be very rigorous in taking this rocket apart and confirming our design assumptions to be confident that it is indeed able to be reused without being taken apart", Elon Musk, SpaceX's founder and CEO, had said during a conference call with reporters, referring to the first Block 5 booster. The Merah Putih satellite is ready to be deployed.

With its fiery exhaust plume visible for dozens of miles around, the Falcon 9 smoothly arced away to the east over the Atlantic Ocean, putting on a spectacular overnight display for area residents and tourists who stayed up late to catch a glimpse of the show.

In May 2018, Falcon 9 was used to send a large communications satellite for Bangladesh from Florida and the vehicle landed on a drone ship, it was inspected, refurbished and made ready for flight again.

The turnaround between the Bangabandhu 1 and Merah Putih missions did not set a record for the shortest time between flights of the same Falcon 9 first stage. SpaceX plans to re-launch a Block 5 rocket on Tuesday just three months after its original flight.

The new satellite will replace the aging Telkom 1 satellite, which has been in operation since 1999. That flight is scheduled for launch next month from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

SpaceX only had a two-hour launch window that opened at 1:18 am EST Tuesday in which to complete the mission.

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