Scientists have caught a odd signal from deep space

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Scientists have caught a odd signal from deep space

Canada's new radio telescope has picked up a mysterious signal from deep in space with a frequency so low, it's never been detected before.

The signal, known as Fast Radio Burst (FRB), lasted only a matter of milliseconds.

This means that whatever produced the signal, which has been named "FRB 180725A", is likely to be extremely powerful.

"Additional FRBs have been found since FRB 180725A and some have flux at frequencies as low as 400 MHz".

One FRB in particular, FRB 121102, has been heard multiple times over the course of several years.

According to a report in The Astronomer's Telegram, on the morning of 25 July 2018, an array of radio telescopes in British Columbia, Canada, detected a very unusual FRB.

The latest mystery signal was detected by CHIME, a state-of-the-art radio telescope that looks like a skateboarder's half-pipe in the mountains of British Columbia.

"The event is clearly detected at frequencies as low as 580 MHz and represents the first detection of an FRB at radio frequencies below 700 MHz", according to a post on The Astronomer's Telegram, a webpage where astronomers can quickly post their new observations.

"These events have occurred during both the day and night and their arrival times are not correlated with known on-site activities or other known sources of terrestrial RFI (radio frequency interference)".

Apparently, it is said that all these signals come from the Milky Way but few of them are dated back to billions of years ago. Most of the time, radio telescopes like this don't hear anything out of the ordinary, but every so often an unexplained signal finds its way through the noise, and that's exactly what happened on July 25th.

Mysterious radio signals emitted from across the universe.

Christopher Conselice, a professor of astrophysics at the University of Nottingham, told MailOnline this discovery could help to pave the way for a greater understanding of what causes FRBs. FRBs aren't uncommon, but they are quite special in that their origins are completely unknown.

"They could be caused by exploding stars, supernova, exotic stars like pulsars, magnetars, neutron stars or massive black holes at the center of distant galaxies".

'It could even be some other physical mechanism that we don't yet understand'.

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