Hurricane Lane expected to impact Hawaiian Islands

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Hurricane Lane expected to impact Hawaiian Islands

Typically, the high will be strong enough to deflect tropical storms and hurricanes south of the Hawaiian Islands as we most recently saw when Hurricane Hector passed south of the islands.

The central Pacific gets fewer hurricanes than other regions, with about only four or five named storms a year.

The strongest hurricane to ever threaten Hawaii is bearing down on the islands as a Category 5 storm. Hurricanes Dot and Iniki, as well as the majority of major hurricanes shown in NOAA's database reached their maximum intensity either far to the south or southeast of the islands. It may take until the weekend for Lane to succumb to wind shear and weaken to a tropical storm.

The forecast track will likely change some over the coming days as Lane interacts with the surrounding atmosphere and the impact from the friction that is caused as Lane nears the islands, namely the Big Island's mountains.

"The centre of Lane will track dangerously close to the islands Thursday through Saturday", the advisory said.

Bearing 250km/h winds, it threatened to dump as much as 50cm of rain over parts of the islands, triggering major flash flooding and landslides. "The last: Hurricane John in 1994".

A tropical storm warning in effect for Big Island Leeward waters and a hurricane watch in effect for the surrounding waters of Maui County and Oahu.

Spinning in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, the hurricane has grown into a monstrous Category 5 storm, the most powerful type of hurricane with winds now reaching 160 miles per hour.

The storm was located about 350 miles south-southeast of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, and 505 miles south-southeast of Honolulu, as of the CPHC's latest update.

Hawaii has been put on alert amid fears a massive hurricane could be about to batter the island, with potential winds of up to 157mph forecast.

Gov. David Ige urged residents on Tuesday to be prepared for "significant impact" from Hurricane Lane.

Damaging tropical-storm-force winds on the Big Island could start as early as this afternoon or evening, with risky hurricane force winds possible by tonight. In 2014, two hurricanes appeared ready to hit Hawaii with a one-two punch, the Associated Press reported at the time. Hurricane Iniki, the most powerful Hawaiian hurricane recorded before Lane, killed six people, injured more than 1,000 and caused $1.8 billion in damage back in 1992, according to TK.

Iniki made landfall on Kauai on September 11, 1992, after making a sharp turn to the north-northeast over the course of the previous two days.

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