Where Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh stands on key business issues

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Where Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh stands on key business issues

He previously served for five years in the White House under former USA president George W. Bush.

At another point during the CNN interview, Shah was asked if Trump was familiar with an article Kavanaugh's wrote that could become relevant to SCOTUS as special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of the Trump campaign unfolds - a 2009 law review article in which Kavanaugh argued that sitting presidents are above the law.

Democrats and others on the left reacted negatively to the president choosing Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the nomination.

His father, also a lawyer, was mentioned merely for inspiring the nominee's love of sports, which Kavanaugh says he has passed on to his young daughters, whose basketball teams he coaches.

Before a full vote on the chamber floor, the prospective justice will be grilled by the Senate Judiciary Committee in hearings that can go on for days. The president has said he wants a nominee who could serve on the high court for decades.

Some of the protesters got on 5th Ave. and laid down on the roadway in front of Trump Tower. Trump wants to leave an enduring mark on the court, giving it a solid five-justice conservative majority for the foreseeable future. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell also received a heads-up from the president.

The vacancy on the nation's highest court was caused by the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy.

The Senate minority leader, Chuck Schumer, has a theory about why Donald Trump settled on Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

"I applaud President Trump for his nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court", Ivey said in a statement.

Senate Democrats have few options to derail Kavanaugh's nomination, but some will join activists in making the case to the American people that Kavanaugh's confirmation could shield Trump from civil lawsuits and criminal investigation.

Hours before Trump was to name his nominee, the White House announced Monday that Kyl would serve as the potential justice's "sherpa" - a guide throughout the process. But almost all Senate Democrats and many Democratic voters are expected to oppose Trump's nominee.

Republicans will target three Democrats facing re-election in conservative states where Trump won big majorities in the 2016 election - Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Joe Donnelly of in - to support Kavanaugh.

Jones was among the Democratic lawmakers invited to the announcement at the White House but did not attend. The group's spending, which is focused on Democratic senators, will probably climb over the coming months to match the $10 million spent to support Justice Neil Gorsuch's nomination a year ago.

Former New Hampshire Sen.

Kyl retired from the Senate seat now occupied by Jeff Flake in 2013 and has been working for Washington-based lobbying firm Covington & Burling.

The White House hopes Kyl's close ties to Senate Republicans will help smooth the path for Trump's eventual selection to win confirmation.

The liberal coalition started holding events on Monday, before the announcement was made, with a focus on the twin issues of keeping abortion legal and maintaining insurance protections for people with preexisting conditions, which are the subject of a federal court case that could eventually reach the Supreme Court.

On the D.C. Court of Appeals, Kavanaugh sided with Priests for Life against the Obama administration's contraception mandate, but also suggested the government has a "compelling interest in facilitating access to contraception for the employees of.religious organizations". Bob Casey of Pennsylvania.

"That's how she votes", he said.

Judge Kavanaugh would have ruled to strike down Obamacare as unconstitutional.

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