Trump adviser apologizes for saying ‘special place in hell’ for Trudeau

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Trump adviser apologizes for saying ‘special place in hell’ for Trudeau

President Donald Trump's tariffs on Canada and his comments about Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will hurt the relationship between the allies, said Bruce Heyman, who was US ambassador to Canada from 2014 to 2017.

"PM Justin Trudeau of Canada acted so meek and mild during our @G7 meetings only to give a news conference after I left saying that, "US Tariffs were kind of insulting" and he 'will not be pushed around, '" Trump fumed on Twitter.

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Sunday that "Canada does not believe that ad hominem attacks are a particularly appropriate or useful way to conduct our relations with other countries".

Bruce Heyman, a former US ambassador to Canada, tweeted that Mr. Navarro should "formally and publicly apologize to Justin Trudeau and more importantly the Canadian people for his insulting and inappropriate remarks".

Of the 3.4 million U.S.jobs lost in that time period, about 2.6 million were lost in the crippled manufacturing industry, making up about three-fourths of the loss of jobs from the U.S.

"We strive to reduce tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers and subsidies", the statement said, which came despite Washington appearing intent on taking more punitive steps on trade. Canadians are "polite, we're reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around", Trudeau said. "I own that; that was my mistake, my words". People speculated that the Trump administration wanted to make an example of Trudeau as a warning to Kim Jong-un about post-summit reversals, which is a odd way to treat an ally and key trading partner if true. "They don't take our farm products", Trump complained at the news conference Tuesday.

"I want to pay a particular tribute to Prime Minister Trudeau for his leadership and skilful chairing, which enabled us after two days of negotiation between leaders to agree actions and a shared approach on some of the most pressing challenges facing the global community and our citizens", she said.

Navarro's willingness to walk back his outburst marked a departure from the Trump administration's never-say-you're-sorry approach to political crises.

White House trade adviser Pete Navarro has apologised for sharp comments he made about Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, US media report.

The United States has alienated Canada and other allies by imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, arguing that they pose a threat to USA national security.

The Canadian Prime Minister initially said Trump's claims that Canadian steel posed a national security threat were dishonest.

Ambrose said the government needs to consider what more it's willing to put on the NAFTA table, keeping in mind that "what's at stake is just so much bigger than our pride". "The wounds will heal, but the question [is] how does the relationship get impacted?" The US president and Mr Trudeau have had a friendly relationship in the past, but tensions over US tariffs have strained the diplomatic partnership.

"Sometimes when we think about tariffs, when we think about a trade war, we lose sight of the real impact, and that's on workers", Singh told a news conference on Parliament Hill.

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