First death reported in E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

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First death reported in E. coli outbreak tied to romaine lettuce

Most of the illnesses in this outbreak are not linked to romaine lettuce from this farm, and are associated with chopped romaine lettuce.

Federal health officials say the death was reported in California, but they did not provide more details.

Kentucky, Massachusetts and Utah are the latest states to report illnesses bringing the total number of states impacted to 25. Twenty-four cases have been reported in California, more than in any other state.

The sweeping advisory came after information tied to some new illnesses prompted health officials to caution against eating all kinds of romaine lettuce that came from Yuma, where the outbreak began.

Since April 27, the date of the CDC's last update, 23 additional people have been infected with the bacteria, and cases have been reported in three new states ― Kentucky, Massachusetts and Utah. Consumers are being advised not to eat or buy romaine lettuce, unless they can confirm that it is not from the Yuma area, the CDC said.

The reported strain of E. coli, which produces poisonous substances known as Shiga toxins, can cause severe stomach cramps, bloody diarrhea and vomiting.

The Food and Drug Administration has identified Harrison Farms of Yuma, Arizona, as the grower and sole source of the whole-head romaine lettuce that sickened several people in an Alaska correctional facility, but has not determined where in the supply chain the contamination occurred.

California now leads the nation with 24 cases, followed by Pennsylvania with 20 and Idaho with 11. In addition, 14 of the hospitalized patients have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome.

If you or a loved one have been sickened with an E. coli O157:H7 infection or HUS, please contact our experienced attorneys for help at 1-888-377-8900. Contact your doctor and write down what you've eaten if you get sick. This advice includes chopped romaine, whole heads, hearts of romaine, baby romaine, organic romaine, and salads and salad mixes that contain romaine lettuce.

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