Reuters Publishes Story Of Myanmar Massacre After 2 Journalists Arrested

Share

Reuters Publishes Story Of Myanmar Massacre After 2 Journalists Arrested

The 4,600-word report, published on February 9, is accompanied by images of the 10 massacre victims before and after they were killed by villagers and soldiers at Inn Din on September 2 a year ago.

Reuters said its reconstruction of the massacre drew for the first time on interviews with Buddhist villagers who admitted torching Rohingya villages, burying bodies and killing Muslims.

They offer evidence of a massacre believed to have taken place on the morning of 2 September past year, after the arrival of troops in the village of Inn Din drove its Rohingya inhabitants to flee.

"Buddhist villagers interviewed for this article reported no attack by a large number of insurgents on security forces in Inn Din", Reuters said, adding that other interviews had revealed the massacre victims included fishermen, shopkeepers, an imam and two teenaged high school students.

Reporting on the massacre by Reuters has led to the arrest of two of the agency's journalists, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, who remain in prison under accusations of breaking Myanmar's official secrets act.

A January statement by the Burmese army on the massacre of the 10 men said security forces were attacked by about 200 Bengalis with sticks and swords, and the security forces had opened fire into the sky, arresting 10 of the villagers while the remainder dispersed. They were all part of the same Rohingya community in Inn Din.

Witnesses have said they were either shot by Myanmar troops or hacked to death by villagers.

Reuters Publishes Story Of Myanmar Massacre After 2 Journalists Arrested
Reuters Publishes Story Of Myanmar Massacre After 2 Journalists Arrested

That possibility has prompted the government of Myanmar to take precautionary steps to be more on guard against ISIS, he said. "And we are not giving blanket denials".

The refugees have been living in squalid camps in south eastern Bangladeshi district of Cox's Bazar bordering Myanmar. British Labour Party lawmaker Rosena Allin-Khan told BBC's Newsnight that the Reuters report was consistent with accounts she had heard while working as a doctor at Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh previous year.

The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) also urged Myanmar to end the military campaign against Muslim Rohingyas.

"As more evidence comes out about the pre-planning and intent of the Myanmar armed forces to wipe out Rohingya villages and their inhabitants, the worldwide community ... needs to focus on how to hold the country's military leaders accountable", said HRW's deputy Asia director Phil Robertson.

Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims have fled to neighbouring Bangladesh in an attempt to escape a violent crackdown by the Myanmar military upon the ethnic minority.

Similarities exist between the Reuters report and the account from the military.

Share

Advertisement

© 2015 Leader Call. All Rights reserved.