Cleaning Up Great Lakes Is Important

Share

Cleaning Up Great Lakes Is Important

It "plays a leading role in preserving and restoring the Great Lakes ecology while strengthening the Great Lakes economy", Huizenga, co-chair of the Great Lakes Task Force, told the Detroit News.

Trump made a similar attempt a year ago but Congress refused to go along. Members of Congress opted to fully fund the program for 2018. The cut proposed in the Trump administration's budget is part of an overall $3 billion budget reduction to the Environmental Protection Agency. The money is used for projects like cleaning up pollution, protecting wildlife and rebuilding wetlands. Climate change has numerous potential impacts on the Great Lakes over the coming decades, many of which we are already seeing. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), unsurprisingly, given that she authored the initiative in 2010 and has continued to champion it since. Advocates say they'll resist the proposed spending cuts.

Ambs says, "The Trump Administration missed a major opportunity to help communities restore their water infrastructure".

The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition consists of more than 150 environmental, conservation, outdoor recreation organizations, zoos, aquariums and museums representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. That's up $397 million from a year ago. And, the Trump plan guts clean water protections that every American depends on for clean, safe drinking water.

The Trump budget now goes to Congress, which will adopt some of it, change most and form its own federal government funding package for fiscal 2019 that must pass the House and Senate before going back to Trump to sign into law. As the Free Pressnotes, the cuts were buried in one line in a 96-page budget without explanation - a move that Democratic Congressman Dan Kildee called "draconian". The health of our Great Lakes must be a higher priority. It's clear that when it comes to the Great Lakes our priorities are at odds with the administration. It works to combat threats to the Great Lakes, such as invasive species or loss of habitats.

"A cut of this magnitude would severely damage Bay restoration efforts, just at a time when we are seeing significant progress", said William Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

Share

Advertisement

© 2015 Leader Call. All Rights reserved.