Takata adds 3.3 million faulty air bag inflators to massive recall

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Takata adds 3.3 million faulty air bag inflators to massive recall

Already the largest automotive recall in US history, Takata has recalled an additional 3.3 million faulty air bag inflators.

Major vehicle manufacturers affected by the model year 2013 recalls include General Motors, Honda, Mercedes-Benz, Toyota, Subaru, and Tesla.

Notices and more information about the recall were posted Saturday on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website.

The airbags use ammonium nitrate to create a small explosion to fill them immediately in a crash, CBS reported, but the chemicals can burn too fast when exposed to high humidity.

These latest recalls are only part of the largest series of automotive recalls in US history.

Since the recall began, Takata has filed for bankruptcy, been fined $1 billion, and three executives have been convicted for falsifying data. If that happens, the airbag can explode with greater force than intended, sending metal fragments into the vehicle's cabin, and could injure or kill the driver or front passenger.

Experts cite that cheating scandals of this nature are not new to the automotive & transportation industry, be it Volkswagen's "defeat devices" or Takata's defective airbag inflators.

NHTSA has said the Takata recalls are unprecedented in size and complexity and have resulted in groundbreaking lessons that will help automakers reach their fix goals.

By the end of this year, Japan-based airbag maker Takata Corp. will have recalled about 65 million cars sold in the United States that included defective airbag inflators made by the company. This could include replacing airbags that were previously replaced under earlier Takata recalls, NHTSA says. The agency also revealed that, Takata's recalls are unprecedented in complexity and size, but nonetheless have resulted in groundbreaking lessons that will aid automakers to accomplish their fix goals faster.

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