Intel unveils 40% faster Wi-Fi chip developed in Israel

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Intel unveils 40% faster Wi-Fi chip developed in Israel

802.11ax uses the limited spectrum more efficiently, thanks to a tech called MU-MIMO, which combines multiple antennas on the same channel for faster speeds and a higher total bandwidth capacity. The Alliance is the group that sets up new Wi-Fi standards internationally.

Intel has announced support for the IEEE 802.11ax standard with new chipsets for 2x2 and 4x4 home routers, and gateways for cables, xDSL, fiber, and consumer retail devices. 802.11ax is expected to perform better even when there are lots of connected devices. The new standard will offer significant improvements over its predecessor, 802.11ac. It handles multiple devices - like all your smart-home gadgets - much better than existing routers, and also has a headline-grabbing top speed of 6,000Mbps, about 300 times faster than the average home internet speed. "It also makes networks more efficient and extends the life of customer device batteries".

These performance enhancements are coming just in time to answer new demands in the smart and connected home.

Intel unveiled today at the CES consumer electronics show in Las Vegas a new generation of Wi-Fi chips that were developed in Israel and enable surfing at a speed 40% faster than the previous generation. There are other chip companies in the connectivity space as well, and Intel making their 802.11ax chips available doesn't alone guarantee mass adoption of the standard. Current phones and laptops won't work on AX gear, but products will roll out throughout the year. That could result in a suboptimal experience in which consumers could see degraded throughput, decreases in network efficiency and increased interference.

Intel has now announced that its 802.11ac chipsets will be released in 2018. Intel's new 802.11ax home Wi-Fi chips will also offer adaptation to older technologies in order to support a wide range of customer devices.

To help OEMs smoothly transition to the new standard, designs based on Intel's 802.11ac infrastructure chipset - the Intel Home Wi-Fi Chipset WAV500 Series - can upgrade to 802.11ax with no change to the host SoC.

The firm's 802.11ax home chipsets are designed with the always-connected nature of our current lifestyles in mind, allowing up to 256 devices to connect simultaneously. "Moreover, wireless transmission goes down entirely from SoC to Wi-Fi chips and thus provides the computer's engine with broadband designated for software and security functions".

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