'TIME' Names the #MeToo 'Silence Breakers' as Person of the Year 2017

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'TIME' Names the #MeToo 'Silence Breakers' as Person of the Year 2017

Dubbed "the silence breakers" in Time's accompanying feature and the #MeToo movement on its shortlist, the magazine's latest honouree recognizes the women and men who, in increasing numbers and with greater success since a pair of October features in The New York Times and New Yorker laid bare the serial predatory behaviour of iconic film producer Harvey Weinstein, have been stepping forward and sharing their stories of being victims of harassment.

"The galvanizing actions of the women on our cover. along with those of hundreds of others, and of many men as well, have unleashed one of the highest-velocity shifts in our culture since the 1960s", explained TIME's editor-in-chief, Edward Felsenthal.

Mr Trump was a finalist again this year, alongside Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos, Wonder Woman director Patty Jenkins, former National Football League star Colin Kaepernick, US Special Counsel Robert Mueller, Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and Chinese President Xi Jinping. The #MeToo campaign was invented in 2006 by activist Tarana Burke, but it was virally utilized this fall.

"I think this is a watershed moment indeed, but I think we need to be clear that this is a moment for some people and not for all people", Burke told Kelly.

"Now the work really begins". She pointed to Isabel Pascual, a strawberry farmer who spoke out about the sexual harassment she faced in her job and noted that she shared her story under a pseudonym because she was afraid of retaliation. Also included is Selma Blair, who accused director James Toback of misconduct, with Swift speaking out against Denver radio DJ David Mueller whom she prevailed over in court this summer.

Time's list cuts across the entertainment, media, tech and service industries, including an unnamed housekeeper at the Plaza hotel.

Whilst speaking to Buzzfeed News, Time National Correspondent Charlotte Alter went on to explain that, "a huge part of this story we're trying to tell here is that as much as the stigma around this has been removed this year because of the "Me Too" movement, it's still really hard for a lot of people to come forward".

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