Senate confirms new DHS chief

Share

Senate confirms new DHS chief

The Senate on Tuesday confirmed Deputy White House chief of staff Kirstjen Nielsen as President Donald Trump's choice to lead the Department of Homeland Security.

The decision came three weeks after the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee approved Nielsen's nomination and almost two months after President Donald Trump selected her for the DHS post.

Nielsen, 45, developed a reputation for fierce devotion to Kelly as his deputy at the White House, and before that as his chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security, which he ran from January until July.

Sen. Kamala Harris (D., Calif.) criticized Nielsen for playing a role in the development of Trump's travel ban and a failure to acknowledge how humans contribute to climate change, according to the AP. The Senate had confirmed Duke for that position on April 4 by a vote of 85-14.

Nielsen, who was nominated in October, was expected to secure confirmation after clearing a procedural hurdle in a 59-33 vote on Monday evening.

Nielsen will be the first cyber professional to head the agency charged with protecting federal civilian networks, leading efforts to coordinate cybersecurity of privately owned critical infrastructure.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTop GOP senators say they have the votes to pass tax bill Angus King on GOP tax push: "To call this a circus would be an insult to circuses" McConnell works to salvage tax bill MORE (R-Ky.) urged senators to back her nomination ahead of Tuesday's vote.

Throughout her confirmation process, Ms. Nielsen failed to demonstrate that she would provide the steady experienced leadership - free from political interference from the White House - that the department needs.

She served in the Transportation Security Administration during the George W. Bush administration and has also worked as a private-sector cybersecurity consultant. "She has been working in and around the Department of Homeland Security since its creation".

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced on September 5 that the DACA program will end in six months, giving Congress time to find a legislative solution for people enrolled in the program.

Share

Advertisement

© 2015 Leader Call. All Rights reserved.