Google Doodle gives Children's Day a miss this year

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Google Doodle gives Children's Day a miss this year

A couple of Years ago, Sir, Friedrich Soennecken documented an everlasting and surprising patent for the opening puncher or what shall we say a Papierlocher fur Sammelmappen that's we it's named.

There's nothing worse that everyone forgetting your birthday, and thanks to Google's sketch, the hole punch will enjoy its day in the sun - although you can't help but think that anything slightly more noteworthy would have gotten the nod ahead of it. Prince Charles - born exactly 62 years after the hole puncher patent was filed - must be particularly ticked off. The doodle, illustrated by Gerben Steenks, showed the Google logo made of colorful paper circles.

Google's blog post on hole punch wrote: It's a familiar scene with a familiar tool: the gentle rat-tat-tat on the table as you square up a dangerously thick stack of papers, still warm from the printer.

It may be recalled that Google used to run a contest called "Doodle 4 India".

Google's homepage features an animated sequence featuring a hole puncher hovering over a piece of paper and punching out two eyes and a happy face. Soennecken was the son of a blacksmith who founded his own company, F Soennecken Verlag, in 1875. Besides the hole puncher, he has invented a binder and a special nib for ink pens suitable for calligraphy. And in honor of the hole puncher's longevity, Google created an illustration of the device as a Google Doodle. It is also used to make holes in leather and thin plastic sheets. The longer the lever, the more sheets of paper can be punched through requiring minimal force.

Soennecken introduced the two-hole punch and the ring binder which is used to organise documents by punching holes in sheets of paper often for the goal of collecting the sheets in a binder or folder.

The design of the hole puncher has not changed much in the 131 years since its invention.

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