Different breast cancer treatments impact employment, income

Share

Different breast cancer treatments impact employment, income

"Our hope is to find a biomarker that would help us diagnose breast cancer quickly and easily".

Other famous women who have received the diagnosis include former first lady Nancy Reagan, Angelina Jolie and Christina Applegate - the latter two undergoing double mastectomies.

Breast Cancer remains the number one cancer faced by Kiwi women, and the Breast Cancer Foundation are on a mission to stop breast cancer dead in its tracks.

Contrary to the western world where breast cancer is common after the age of 50 years, the highest incidence of breast cancer in India is between the ages of 40 and 50 years, said Raghu Ram.

"It worries many women I think", said Missoula resident Camill Severti.

UBF and KIMS-Ushalakshmi Centre for Breast Diseases, which completed 10 years, has undertaken many unique initiatives to empower people about importance of early detection of breast cancer.

For the study, researchers examined data on 1,006 working women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer in 2014 and 2015. Adding, "The new test will give women more options and help them to make a more informed decision".

The feeling of not being able to work and isolation can be devastating for most patients and survivors, re-entering employment is crucial to returning back to normality and getting their life back.

"Prior studies have shown that most of the women who had bilateral mastectomy could have chosen lumpectomy but chose the more aggressive surgery, often out of a desire to improve peace of mind".

The study wasn't a controlled experiment created to prove how different treatment options directly cause missed work or lost wages.

"Women should start by figuring out what treatment has the best chance of curing their cancer", Hassett, who wasn't involved in the study, said by email. All treatments are individualized for what that particular patient needs.

Share

Advertisement

© 2015 Leader Call. All Rights reserved.