Hurricane Will Possibly Weaken Into Tropical Storm, Says NHC

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Hurricane Will Possibly Weaken Into Tropical Storm, Says NHC

It was located about 450 miles north northeast of Grand Turk Island, Turks and Caicos, and 645 miles north northwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and was moving to the east at five miles per hour.

Hurricane Jose is now travelling in a clockwise circle, but could go north later in the week.

Jose will actually be one of the rare hurricanes to take a looping path.

While it may be uncomfortably close to the Carolinas at times, almost all computer models indicate that the storm will stay well off the coast.

Connecticut's weather next Monday through Wednesday is largely dependent on the track of Hurricane Jose.

During that time, Jose will be moving generally westward then more northward. Forecasters warned that those in the Bermuda, Bahamas and U.S. East Coast should continue monitoring the storm's path to determine whether they'd be impacted.

Caicos before Irma
Caicos before Irma

Fortunately, over the weekend, Jose only brushed the islands of the Caribbean that had been slammed by Irma, such as Barbuda, Antigua and the Virgin Islands.

Meteorologist Eleanor Bell, of The Weather Channel, said: "Models are continuing to struggle to resolve the track of this storm".

The Atlantic Basin hurricane season starts up June 1st and runs until the end of November.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from Jose's center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 140 miles, the National Hurricane Center said. The loop back toward the coast comes after Jose is expected to travel southwest - essentially backwards - and then move closer to shore.

In May, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said that unseasonably warm ocean temperatures and a no-show from El Niño would contribute to a potentially "extremely active" hurricane season.

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