John Bel Edwards declares state of emergency over New Orleans flooding concerns

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John Bel Edwards declares state of emergency over New Orleans flooding concerns

Some of the turbines have been out for a while, Landrieu said.

Speaking at an emergency Sewerage & Water Board meeting August 10, Mayor Mitch Landrieu said a "whole army" of people are working on repairs, and he expects the turbine to be back online soon, adding, "I'll believe it when I see it". Landrieu has also declared a state of emergency in New Orleans, which allows city government to circumvent some regulations to respond more quickly to a disaster. "If all the power from Entergy continues - and we expect that it will - we will be able to handle any typical rainfall".

A fire at a turbine that supplies power to drainage pump stations on New Orleans' East Bank has threatened the city's ability to pump water out, as another round of rain is expected to dump water on the city. Four constant duty pumps were out of service in the Lower 9th Ward and New Orleans East. The Office of the Mayor had no further details on the fire.

The National Weather Service predicts rain in the area today, causing city officials to send out multiple emergency warnings overnight.

The loss of the turbine comes as the latest blow to the Sewage and Water Board (S&WB) which came under criticism after it was revealed that pumping capacity was reduced during the floods on Saturday and on July 22.

The city of New Orleans is looking for outside companies to both run the Sewerage and Water Board on an interim basis and to do a look back at the issues the agency had with the running of the pumps and the disseminated information over the weekend. Twelve hours after the rain had stopped, a number of neighborhoods remained flooded, and residents even in higher lying areas reported several feet of water - for some, the most since Katrina. (According to the mayor's office, the city's drinking water is unaffected.) But there already are three other turbines down for repairs - leaving only one working turbine left.

By Tuesday, however, the board acknowledged that eight pumps were either broken or out of service when the rain began. Meteorological models aren't high resolution enough to say exactly where and when; at least 10 inches, if not 15, fell this morning in the northern part of the state (see map above) and there's no reason to think that couldn't happen in New Orleans at any time over the next week. "We now find ourselves in a vulnerable position".

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