Charlottesville Judge Sides With Alt-Right, Violence Breaks Out at Rotunda

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Charlottesville Judge Sides With Alt-Right, Violence Breaks Out at Rotunda

He said he considered the viewpoint of those supporting the rally "abhorrent", but also says it's their right to peacefully express it.

Citing crowd safety concerns, the city of Charlottesville approved a protest permit earlier this week for the event to specifically be held in a different larger park instead of the smaller Emancipation Park where the Lee statue stands.

Writing on Twitter, she said: 'They are coming for the church!

Cliff Erickson leaned against a fence and took in the scene. The demonstrators then clashed with counter-protesters.

BLM joins dozens of other groups to protest the rally, saying that they plan to out number the rally-goers.

"This is about an anti-white climate within the Western world and the need for white people to have advocacy like other groups do", he said in an interview. University police arrested one person who was charged with assault and disorderly conduct, a university statement Saturday said.

Organizers say the Unite the Right rally on Saturday aims to "unify the right-wing against a totalitarian Communist crackdown" and to protest "displacement level immigration policies" in the USA and Europe.

The event, called the Unite the Right Free Speech Rally, "seeks to affirm the right of Southerners and white people to organize for their interests" according to its Facebook event page.

He blamed Charlottesville officials for cancelling the rally.

At 11:15 a.m. Governor McAuliffe declared a state of emergency to "aid the violence" at the rally.

Police instituted road closures around downtown, and many businesses in the popular open-air shopping mall opted to close for the day. He also witnessed the auto hitting pedestrians as it went in reverse.

An estimated several hundred white nationalists descended on the University of Virginia's campus in Charlottesville on Friday night for an impromptu torchlit rally. A spokeswoman for the University of Virginia Hospital said it treated 20 patients from the incident, and one had died.

White nationalists, including members of the Ku Klux Klan, have rallied repeatedly in Charlottesville this year since the city began the process of removing Confederate statues from public land.

"I'm not going to make any bones about it".

For many Americans, they are outdated symbols of racism, and have been mobilizing to have them taken down from public places.

The historic city, home of Thomas Jefferson and the University of Virginia, has become the latest Southern battleground over the contested removal of Confederate monuments.

A representative for the city of Charlottesville did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for a comment in regard to the lawsuit.

Efforts to move the protest to McIntire Park were quashed when a judge ruled Friday that it could go ahead at Emancipation Park.

In a statement, the city said it would honor the judge's decision.

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