Stadium measure's defeat likely ends St. Louis' MLS chances

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Stadium measure's defeat likely ends St. Louis' MLS chances

Voters likely rejected the possibility of bringing Major League Soccer to St. Louis in Wednesday's municipal elections.

The second proposition, which was rejected by about 53 percent of voters, would have directed the roughly $50 million generated by the second tax and up to $10 million from the sales tax increase toward an MLS stadium.

Both propositions needed to pass in order to fund the MLS project.

If Prop 1 passes and Prop two fails, the use tax still increases but the extra money would go into the city's general fund like it does now.

TAMPA/ST. PETERSBURG. A poll by St. Pete Polls shows that 70 percent of registered city voters support a referendum to approve an ordinance giving the St. Petersburg city council the authority to negotiate a use agreement for the Rowdies for city-owned Al Lang Stadium on a long-term basis. The vote would have allocated $60 million in public funding toward the construction of a new soccer stadium for a proposed MLS expansion franchise.

Mayor-elect Lyda Krewson said "there's not a plan in place at this time" for that new money.

Groups from 12 American cities, including San Diego, formally applied for an MLS expansion team in January.

"We have a lot of needs in this city", Krewson said.

St. Louis' professional soccer hopes may have died Tuesday.

The plan calls for building commercial and office buildings, housing, a river park and a hybrid soccer-college football stadium.

Kavanaugh went a step further in an interview with the St. Louis Business Journal, saying the ownership group is likely to disband and end its effort.

Waiting for San Diego to vote on November 7 would push the decision toward the end of that timeline, though MLS spokesman Dan Courtemanche told the Union-Tribune on Tuesday that the league still plans on announcing its next two expansion teams by December 31.

The estimated cost of the comprehensive plan is $2.2 billion and would require a combination of federal, state and local funding, city officials said.

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