Google expands 'fact check' conclusions in news searches

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Google expands 'fact check' conclusions in news searches

"This label identifies articles that include information fact checked by news publishers and fact-checking organizations", reads a blog post co-authored by Jigsaw product manager Justin Kosslyn and Google researcher Cong Yu. Users will be able to conduct searches that returns an authoritative result containing multiple fact checks for claims, which will be displayed in tandem with search results pages on Google News. Their conclusions will appear in search results as long as they meet certain criteria for automation. This signifies that the article had been verified as true by news and fact-checking organizations.

After launching a preliminary test in October, Google has officially rolled out an automatic fact check tag program on its search pages. Clicking through to that article would show you that that number was researched and found to be in line with worldwide human rights organizations' research and estimates.

"The snippet will display information on the claim, who made the claim, and the fact check of that particular claim", the two wrote. For this, it has introduced "fact check" for search and its news results.

Google will work with the likes of Snope and PolitiFact as well as more traditional publishers like the New York Times and the Washington Post. Google makes it very clear that it has nothing to do with this process; it is simply contributing to giving users the ability to make informed decisions for themselves.

The search giant will not actually be doing the fact checking itself but instead will surface results from the likes of PolitiFact and Snopes. Finally, Google's algorithms need to determine that they are an authoritative source of information. On the contrary, Google does link its fact check tool to the fact-checking sites run by Duke.

But this information will not be enabled for all search results and there might be sites where different publishers have checked the claims and reached different conclusions.

Google acknowledged that different publishers will have different opinions on the validity of news stories, but said it would help people understand the "degree of consensus" on an overall topic.

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