First woman to officially run Boston Marathon finishes race again at 70

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(There were 43 women ages 70 and older registered for this year's marathon.) She said she felt overwhelmingly grateful for the streets of Boston after crossing the finish line.

She finished the race on Monday in four hours and 44 minutes - only 24 minutes slower than her first race aged 20. The dedication and diversity of the crowd is reflected in the numbers compiled by the Boston Athletic Association on the 2017 race.

Kathrine Switzer in 1967, as a race official tries to get her off course during the Boston Marathon. Her bib number was officially retired afterwards.

Switzer captured the occasion with a video near the spot where Semple attempted to yank her off the course and posted it on her Facebook page. And someday, maybe you can run a marathon.

But Briggs struck a deal with her: If Switzer could complete the distance on a training run, he would bring her himself. "They would just think that I was a clown, and that women were barging into events where they had no ability". "He was like an evangelist and helped me sign up".

By registering her name as "K.V. Switzer" it hid her gender.

"I generally am pretty law-abiding".

"It was awesome out there", she said.

"But am I bold?"

" 'You'll never have children, ' they said. I ask for forgiveness".

"We thought we were following the rules", Switzer said. Semple, who died in 1988, maintained he was trying to protect his race from worldwide rules that sanctioned only men's marathons.

Kirui led another Kenyan sweep when two times former World marathon champion Edna Kiplagat won the women's race in 2:21:53, beating Kenyan born Rose Chelimo of Bahirain to second place in 2:22:51. She established 261 Fearless(based on the number she wore at Boston) - a global community of female walkers, joggers and runners that's all about sisterhood and encouragement. You know, we laugh about it now because it's so amusing when a girl is saved by her burly boyfriend. But. "Women's marathoning has created a global legacy".

"What happened to me was a radicalizing experience". The woman, who was holding an American flag, and Granville immediately embrace after he sets her down. It sounds amusing now, but there were serious rules barring women from sports, especially running races.

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