Interpol issues "red notice" for North Koreans in murder mystery

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Interpol issues

The Malaysian government said it has confirmed the identity of the body of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un's half-brother Kim Jong-nam, using a DNA sample from one of his children.

In addition to the four men listed by Interpol, Malaysian police have identified three other North Koreans as suspects in the case, and who are believed to be hiding out in Pyongyang's embassy in Kuala Lumpur.

Police requested Interpol's help to apprehend the suspects last month.

The four who are subject to the red notice - which is similar to an worldwide arrest warrant - are believed to have made their way back to North Korea's capital Pyongyang.

An Interpol red notice is effectively an global arrest warrant.

The East Asian country has refused to acknowledge that the man murdered was Kim Jong-nam, claiming he was carrying a diplomatic passport bearing another name.

North Korea denies that the body is Kim Jong Nam's, but they have repeatedly demanded that Malaysian authorities hand it over.

"The only parties that will benefit from this incident are the enemy countries".

The four North Koreans who had fled the country are Rhi Ji-hyon, 33; Hong Song-hac, 34; O Jong-gil, 55; and Ri Jae-nam, 57. "You have to wait", Deputy Police Inspector-General Noor Rashid Ibrahim told reporters.

Zahid also brushed off calls by North Korea for an global inquiry over the use of VX in Kim's death, saying the North has shown that it doesn't respect decisions made by worldwide bodies in reference to its nuclear program.

It is not clear where Mr Kim's wife and children are, although his son appeared in a video last week and said the family were together.

"(The DNA) is taken from his (Jong-Nam) son who is overseas, I can not reveal the place but our authorities went there.

Malaysian Foreign Minister Anifah Aman said over the weekend that negotiations with Pyongyang to secure the exit of Malaysians stuck in North Korea would take place in a matter of "days".

Malaysia have since retaliated and also banned North Koreans from leaving.

In a separate development, Prime Minister Najib Razak said Malaysia has not started formal negotiations with North Korea over the release of nine Malaysians stranded in Pyongyang.

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