Industry welcomes Ben Carson as 17th HUD secretary

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Industry welcomes Ben Carson as 17th HUD secretary

Carson had not spoken extensively about housing policy ahead of his confirmation hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.), Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), Joe Manchin (D-W.V.), Jon Tester (D-Mont.) and Mark Warner (D-Va.).

But, as seen in the vote count, 58-41, there was still plenty of opposition to his nomination.

Carson had a relatively easy path to confirmation, at least compared to other Trump administration nominees.

Carson, who, through a spokesperson past year admitted he had no qualifications to be a cabinet secretary, will be in charge of a $50 billion federal government agency whose mission he has said he does not support.

Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) facing criticism from the left over initial support for Carson, his confirmation vote hewed more closely to party lines. Carson has never held public office and has no housing policy experience. Born in Detroit, he was raised by a single mother with a third-grade education.

President Donald Trump's choice to tap Carson - who does not have experience in issues related to housing - to head the department was met with skepticism from Democrats. He was approved unanimously in the committee. "I don't think it's the right position for him". The retired neurosurgeon will lead the agency with 8,300 employees and a budget around $47 billion. "It is critical that he build on the agency's work affirmatively furthering fair housing, work to prevent homelessness, increase homeownership opportunities through the Federal Housing Administration, ensure strong enforcement of the nation's fair housing laws, and ensure that the nation's housing programs are adequately funded so that all Americans have access to safe, affordable housing".

"We're going to do great things in our African-American communities", Trump said, appearing with Carson on a tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington. "Housing inventories are tight and mortgage credit is hard to come by, and at the same time far too many buyers are saddled with high rents and student debt that stand in the way of saving for a down payment".

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