Texas has 'let go' coach Charlie Strong after 3 seasons

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A person with direct knowledge of the discussions said Saturday that Herman has told Houston he is leaving the Cougars to coach the Longhorns.

Tom Herman now gets his chance for a Texas takeover.

Tom Herman, who has coached Houston into national prominence during the last two seasons, is headed to Texas.

With an official announcement of Herman's hiring expected later Saturday, Texas will seek a quick turnaround.

Texas head coach Charlie Strong walks on the field before an NCAA college football game against TCU, Friday, Nov. 25, 2016, in Austin, Texas. Neither scenario happened, however, as the Cougars dropped midseason games against Navy and SMU and the Big 12 chose not to expand.

When he arrived in Austin in 2013 as Texas' first black football coach, Charlie Strong was thought to be the coach who could restore the Longhorns to national glory following a decline in the program's fortunes in Mack Brown's final years at the school. Herman had surfaced as a possible candidate at other schools as well, notably LSU.

Strong was hired from Louisville in 2014 to replace Mack Brown, who won the 2005 season national championship but was later pushed out when the program slid into several years of mediocrity.

Texas is desperate for a return to the nation's elite. His overall record at the school was 16-21, and he never finished with a winning record at the school, with his best finish in the Big 12 being a tie for fourth place in his first year.

Herman leaves Houston after just two seasons with the program to become the head coach of the Texas Longhorns.

The terms of Herman's deal with Texas have not been reported, although LSU was reportedly willing to double Herman's $3 million annual salary with Houston, according to people who spoke to USA Today's Glenn Guilbeau on Friday.

"I came away very impressed with their unified vision and commitment to football, and I'm excited to be the head coach at the flagship university of the greatest state in the union". He has coached at the college level in Texas for more than a decade, and holds a master's in education from the University of Texas.

"It's a very hard day for me, my family and all of the people affected by this decision". "I accept full responsibility for that, but know in my heart that we accomplished our primary goal, which is the development of young men".

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